No Justice, No Peace
       
     
Women on the Outside / Pretty Girl Charged with Clever Swindle
       
     
Ian Willms: We Shall See
       
     
Collier Schorr: 8 Women
       
     
No Justice, No Peace
       
     
No Justice, No Peace

MagMag: A Journal of International Art
2017

"No Justice, No Peace participates in the long history of Black resistance to the systemic racism that has cultivated inequality for centuries. NJNP places itself, and its audience, within that history, and asks us, repeatedly, what we are going to do about it. I HAVE A LOT OF QUESTIONS AS TO WHY CIVILIANS CONTINUE GETTING KILLED BY LAW ENFORCEMENT. Many of the images here — and the signs they document — are questions. Their questions offer an opening into the future, and we are invited to respond. To act."

Women on the Outside / Pretty Girl Charged with Clever Swindle
       
     
Women on the Outside / Pretty Girl Charged with Clever Swindle

MagMag: A Journal of International Art
2016

"Despite the century that separates them, both Pretty Girl and Women on the Outside highlight the interconnected dynamics of gender, race, and power as they play out in the complex network of the criminal justice system in the United States — what Zara Katz and Lisa Riordan Seville have elsewhere called an 'incarceration nation.'" 

Ian Willms: We Shall See
       
     
Ian Willms: We Shall See

MagMag: A Journal of International Art
2016

"Willms redoubles this vulnerability with other curatorial choices. The photographs are printed on semi-transparent paper that refuses easy distinctions between surface and depth; they are both translucent and opaque, depending on your perspective. This paper reminds me of the thin, inscribed skin of the balloons pictured in He said, 'I never thought I'd live to see 2015' (2015) — so delicate, so fleeting."

Collier Schorr: 8 Women
       
     
Collier Schorr: 8 Women

MagMag: A Journal of International Art
2014

"The reflective surfaces of frames and floors offer Schorr another means of tying the exhibition together and placing the images in dialogue with each other. As I gaze at the model in Picture for Women (2010), I see the model in Boots, Chair, Hair (1998) reflected in her red skirt; similar reflections occur throughout the exhibit — one woman's body appearing literally within another's, often on or near the pelvic region, with all accompanying connotations of touch, desire, consumption."